Posts tagged "calligraphy"
144
Reblogged from ArtPropelled
yama-bato:

Suiteki or water-dropper for painting or calligraphy in the form of a stylized cicada, of hammered, cold chiseled and assembled silver. Signed on the lower left side with a chiseled signature by the artist: Haruhiko (Otani Haruhiko, the gō or art name of Otani Kenzo, 1906 - 1981). Shōwa 16 or 1941.
link

yama-bato:

Suiteki or water-dropper for painting or calligraphy in the form of a stylized cicada, of hammered, cold chiseled and assembled silver. Signed on the lower left side with a chiseled signature by the artist: Haruhiko (Otani Haruhiko, the gō or art name of Otani Kenzo, 1906 - 1981). Shōwa 16 or 1941.

link

30

artemisdreaming:

Water Stains on the Wall

Choreography:  LIN Hwai-min   

Music: Toshio HOSOKAWA   

Lighting Design: Lulu W.L. LEE   

Costume Design: LIN Ching-ju   

Projection Design: Ethan WANG   

Set Design: LIN Hwai-min   

Co-productions National Chiang Kai-Shek Cultural Center, R.O.C. (Taiwan);Esplanade—Theatres on the Bay, Singapore    Premiere November 19, 2010 at the National Theater, Taipei 

Covered with white Marley, the entire set looks like a blank piece of rice paper traditionally used by Chinese calligraphers and painters, onto which negative images of drifting clouds in different shades of black are projected. With movements reminiscent of free-flowing ink, these ever-morphing clouds create exquisite spaces that are constantly shifting, bringing Chinese landscape ink painting to life on stage.

Accompanied by the renowned contemporary Japanese composer Toshio Hosokawa’s Zen-like music using traditional Asian instruments, Cloud Gate dancers whirl and leap high on the slanted space with deceiving ease. Firmly grounded on the ramp at a height of 1.25 meters, yet appearing to be floating all the time, the dancers give the illusion of clouds and water as their light skirts are frequently “dyed” black by the projected shadows and reappear in shining white light.

The title of the work derives from a legendary conversation between two of the most respected Chinese calligraphers from the Tang Dynasty (618 – 907):

“Where do you get inspirations for your calligraphic style?” asked Yen Chen-ching, whose signature style of Kai script brought Chinese calligraphy to a new height. 

“I observe summer clouds that resemble mountains with spectacular peaks,” replied Huai Su, the young monk who later became the most renowned master of wild cursive style. “The most exciting parts remind one of birds flying out of woods and snakes slithering into bushes… .”

“How about water stains on the wall?” asked Yen Chen-ching.

“Right on! You old devil!” exclaimed Huai Su.

 

In reality, water stains on the wall are the result of a long process of natural, organic, and fluid evolution. The legend of the conversation established “water stains on the wall” as a popular metaphor that represents the highest aesthetics of Chinese calligraphy. Inspired by this metaphor, Lin Hwai-min and Cloud Gate dancers create an abstract work of spellbinding beauty and breathtaking technique that stands sublimely on its own. via:  cloudgate.org

 

29
Reblogged from Artemis Dreaming
artemisdreaming:

Inkstone and box, Qing dynasty (1644–1911), early 18th century, inscribed with dates corresponding to 1370 and 1702ChinaGreen schist and wood
L. 8 1/4 in. (21 cm)Gift of Marion Chait Howe and Allan S. Chait, in memory of Ralph M. Chait and Libby E. Chait, 1981 (1981.120.1a-c)
On view: Gallery 219   Last Updated April 12, 2011
The green inkstone is carved in the shape of bamboo stem segments and is adorned in low relief with leafy branches rising from behind rocks. The slanted surface of the sunken grinding area displays multiple layers of natural markings within the stone in purple and various shades of green. The wooden box is also carved in the shape of a length of bamboo.
The ink slab and its case bear three inscriptions, which offer clues and raise questions about the work’s date. An inscription on the underside of the stone and one on the lid of the box, although signed Qinggong Daoren and Nancun, respectively, both have the same seal, Zuo. While these names are unknown from other sources, they probably denote the same person. The stone’s inscription is dated to 1370, which is curiously early, considering the good condition of the box. The third inscription, on the upper side of the slab, comprising eight delicate characters executed in regular script, is dated to the summer solstice of the renwu year (1702), signed Wang Shizhen (1634–1711), a preeminent poet of the early Qing period, and is followed by Wang’s seal, Yuan. If this inscription is not a genuine ownership mark by Wang Shizhen, it is likely to have been added either during Wang’s time or not long after his death. From 1722 onward, because the character zhen in Wang’s name also occurred in the personal name of the newly enthroned Yongzheng emperor (r. 1723–35), the characters of Wang’s name were replaced by others that have a similar sound. Since here Wang’s name was written in its original form, the inscription was probably carved before 1722. metmuseum

artemisdreaming:

Inkstone and box, Qing dynasty (1644–1911), early 18th century, inscribed with dates corresponding to 1370 and 1702
China
Green schist and wood

L. 8 1/4 in. (21 cm)
Gift of Marion Chait Howe and Allan S. Chait, in memory of Ralph M. Chait and Libby E. Chait, 1981 (1981.120.1a-c)

On view: Gallery 219   Last Updated April 12, 2011

The green inkstone is carved in the shape of bamboo stem segments and is adorned in low relief with leafy branches rising from behind rocks. The slanted surface of the sunken grinding area displays multiple layers of natural markings within the stone in purple and various shades of green. The wooden box is also carved in the shape of a length of bamboo.

The ink slab and its case bear three inscriptions, which offer clues and raise questions about the work’s date. An inscription on the underside of the stone and one on the lid of the box, although signed Qinggong Daoren and Nancun, respectively, both have the same seal, Zuo. While these names are unknown from other sources, they probably denote the same person. The stone’s inscription is dated to 1370, which is curiously early, considering the good condition of the box. The third inscription, on the upper side of the slab, comprising eight delicate characters executed in regular script, is dated to the summer solstice of the renwu year (1702), signed Wang Shizhen (1634–1711), a preeminent poet of the early Qing period, and is followed by Wang’s seal, Yuan. If this inscription is not a genuine ownership mark by Wang Shizhen, it is likely to have been added either during Wang’s time or not long after his death. From 1722 onward, because the character zhen in Wang’s name also occurred in the personal name of the newly enthroned Yongzheng emperor (r. 1723–35), the characters of Wang’s name were replaced by others that have a similar sound. Since here Wang’s name was written in its original form, the inscription was probably carved before 1722. metmuseum



8